Death Valley—Day 2

  Starting the day in the ghost town of Rhyolite…

 

Salt Creek… fish in the desert!

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Mesquite Dunes…

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Barefoot in the rain in the desert!

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Lunch—last stop in the park…

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Driving home…

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-S

Long Beach!

Long days are one of the best things about summer.
Spent the afternoon in Long Beach paddle boating, then at the Aquarium.  :)

 

WARNING: 
HANNAH.

THERE IS A PHOTO OF A SHARK.
HANNAH.

 

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HANNAH DON’T LOOK AT THE NEXT PHOTO.

..

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Everyone looks pooped after a long day…

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-S

Chinese New Year Dinner!

It’s the Lunar New Year, and to welcome the upcoming year my family (which includes Henning and his mom) had a New Years Eve feast!

It is generally traditional to eat certain specific foods at the New Year, because they sound like or rhyme with auspicious words in Chinese.  For example, we say “Gung hay fat choy” (恭喜發財) in Cantonese, which roughly translates to “Congratulations and be prosperous.”  So we also eat a black algae at the new year called “fat choy” (different characters, same sound) in order to bring prosperity.  :)

Likewise, we usually eat fish (魚yú) because it sounds like the Chinese word for “surpluses” (餘yú).

It looks scary, but we steam our fish (with ginger and scallions) and serve it whole.  That way you know it’s fresh!

Even Henning (who doesn’t like seafood) admitted it tasted good.  :)

-S